Chef and Restaurateur Edouardo Jordan Shares His Favorite Dishes and Destinations

James Beard Award-winning chef Edouardo Jordan operates three prestigious eateries in Seattle’s sleepy Ravenna neighborhood: JuneBaby, Salare and Lucinda Grain Bar. While many might consider the chef to be a man of the city, the classically trained restaurant owner also has a true passion for nature. Indeed, Jordan says it was one of the reasons he first moved to the Emerald City from his native Florida in 2006.

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Chronicles of Country Music

Ken Burns remembers sitting in a tiny editing room, sobbing, as he put together his latest documentary, Country Music. In fact, the acclaimed filmmaker says, there are often a half-dozen boxes of tissues in the office for him and his staff to use as they pore through old photographs and emotional testimonials—content they choose from to tell intimate stories about impactful time periods, iconic structures and significant cultural movements in American history.

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Nurse Mady Howard Advances To American Ninja Warrior Finals

As a nurse, it can often feel like you’re climbing never-ending staircases, running down the halls as if the last few seconds of a clock is ticking out, or that you’re climbing walls and swinging from problem to problem. The job can be that tough, draining and demanding. But for ICU nurse, Madyson Howard, those hurdles and gauntlets are a part of her life outside the hospital, too. The nurse is also a finalist on the nationally televised program, American Ninja Warrior.

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Steve Earle Talks Death, The Wire, Guitars And Leaving Home

American singer-songwriter, Steve Earle, is a living legend. Between his decades touring the country, playing his jangly-heavy guitar for audiences thirsty for stories of the road and dust kicked up, and his years acting on hit television shows like HBO’s The Wire and Treme, Earle is known for his folk wisdom and sharp tongue. He’s a veteran of the Texas, New Orleans and Nashville music circuits and he’s a staple for those combing through the decades of Americana music greatness. I caught up with Earle to ask him about the first time he picked up a guitar, what it was like leaving his parents at an early age to pursue songwriting and what he’d like to experience just before he died.

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Valerie June On Brad Pitt, Banana Candy, Etherial Portals And Time

Valerie June finally has free time. After a life working odd jobs and steeling moments to write songs, the lilting, butterfly-voiced Americana singer has room to make her art, unfettered by traditional responsibilities. And, she says, this is the best thing she could have hoped for. June talked about this newfound resource and the freedom it offers her ever-evolving creativity. She also talked about the time she met Brad Pitt (and nearly passed out), what her favorite candy was as a kid and how she grew up singing gospel music with family and friends all around her.

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H.R. Of Bad Brains On Headaches, Human Rights And Speeding Up Songs

Paul “H.R.” Hudson is the longtime front man for Bad Brains, a group founded in 1979 and often credited with creating the original hardcore sound. Through fast, energetic songs and snarling, high-pitched vocals, Bad Brains raced through shows as their fans moshed all around them. Bad Brains also often played reggae between the punk rock. And after decades in the scene, the band only plays reggae at shows today. This fall, H.R. (short for Human Rights) is releasing a new solo record, Give Thanks, a reggae-inspired album filled with the uplifting music he’s made his signature. I caught up with the front man to talk with him about the origins of Bad Brains, what they talked about as they were creating a new sound and what it was like for H.R. to get brain surgery later in life after enduring a series of terrible headaches.

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DAVID MARCHESE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE ON DEATH, DIET COKE, AND WAYNE GRETZKY

If you’re a fan of celebrity, chances are you’ve encountered the work of David Marchese. His interviews, whether published by his former employer, New York Magazine, or his current one, The New York Times Magazine, regularly unearth some of the more revelatory details about our most mystifying stars. The most famous example is probably Marchese’s 2018 conversation with Quincy Jones, during which he revealed, among other things, that he used to date Ivanka Trump. But there are countless examples of other eyebrow-raisers in Marchese’s ouvre; in his interview with Eminem, the rapper said he frequented strip clubs and Tinder to find dates post-divorce. Or, there’s his recent interview with Whoopi Goldberg, where she admitted that hosting The View is not “enough.” 

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Sonics Great Detlef Schrempf On Music, Money And Matrimony

It’s been 20 years since Seattle SuperSonics legend, Detlef Schrempf, suited up in the green and gold, but that hasn’t stopped the former All-NBA player from making a home in the Emerald City area (Bellevue, technically), where the German-born sharp-shooter lives, plays golf and works at an investment firm, Coldstream Capital. I caught up with Schrempf at Third Culture Coffee in Old Bellevue to ask him about the music he listened to when he hooped, his favorite Seattle bands in college and who decides on the soundtrack in an NBA locker room.

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Talib Kweli On Freestyling, Reading, Black Star And Lauryn Hill

If you came of age in the 90s or early 2000s, backpack or underground hip-hop was likely a large part of the music in your favorite CD binder (and later your iPod). That being the case, one of your favorite rappers was likely Talib Kweli, the Brooklyn-based emcee who rose to fame with his brother-in-rap, Mos Def (aka Yasiin Bey) and other fellow mic rippers like Common Sense and The Roots. Since those years, Kweli, who plays Nectar Lounge July 27, has solidified himself as an important voice when it comes to socially conscious ideas and practices. To preview his upcoming Emerald City show, I caught up with Kweli to ask him about those early years, if he read a lot as a kid and when he first began to write and perform.

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TONY MILLIONAIRE’S JOURNEY FROM DISHWASHER TO RENOWNED CARTOONIST

Before becoming a renowned cartoonist, Tony Millionaire struggled to find any work at all. But after quitting a middling dishwashing job, he had an epiphany. He decided to go door-to-door in wealthy neighborhoods drawing the manicured mansions to sell to the people who lived there, earning a living one $25 piece at a time. In the winter, though, the drawing work dried up and Millionaire had to scramble to find new income, eventually landing a job as a demolition man.

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UPPER HAND: THE MOST NOTORIOUS CARD COUNTER IN AMERICA

Professional card counter, David Drury, began his career calculating odds and beating casinos because of a little “divine intervention.” Dury, a regular churchgoer, had picked up a few card-counting tricks from books and was instantly hooked. Not long after, a friend from church started a high stakes blackjack team.“What are the chances?” Drury says. Dury joined, honed his skills, and since he’s flown the country, stayed in suites, and bet thousands of dollars of other people’s money. For a time, he was even known as one of the “most notorious card counters in America.”

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TRASH TIKI: A COCKTAIL POP-UP TACKLES BAR WASTE

If you spent any time in a bar last year, you very likely heard the buzz surrounding single-use straws. Little table tents and posters proclaiming “Straws suck” are everywhere. Across the nation, bars are eliminating single-use straws. But have you heard of single-use foods? No? Well, that’s where Kelsey Ramage, Iain Griffiths, and their concept-driven business called Trash Tiki, come into play.

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WHICH WAY TO LOOK? IS SOCIAL MEDIA DESTROYING SOCIETY?

“It takes me back to feeling like a left-out teenager,” says beloved Seattle singer-songwriter and new mother, Shelby Earl, when speaking about her recent experiences using Facebook. “Feeling like someone’s relationship looks healthier than mine, or their music career looks like it’s thriving more than mine. In our regular lives, we compare ourselves to other people, but not as readily. We’re not seeing so many people and what they’re up to all the time the way we do with social media. It can make you feel like you’re the one doing it wrong.”

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Nurse Opens Domestic Violence Shelter That Gives Free Healthcare To Homeless and Uninsured

It’s hard to know where to begin when talking about Asma Inge-Hanif. The hardworking, selfless caregiver, who is the director and co-Founder of IBM/Al-Nisaa Healthy Solutions Medical Center, has done so much for others throughout her career. She is a nurse, a chaplain, and has started countless initiatives to help underserved and forgotten people and she does so having seen so much sadness in and around her life over the years. 

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