Posts tagged Seattle Weekly
Celebrate Black History Month With Seattle Chef Edouardo Jordan

When chef Edouardo Jordan encounters something, he examines it thoroughly. For the Seattle-based restaurateur, winner of two prestigious James Beard Foundation Awards (Best Chef Northwest and Best New Restaurant for JuneBaby), nothing important is taken at face value. Rather, Jordan is interested in a thing’s origin and what it might be used for in the future, whether traditionally or untraditionally. Which is why, when he decides to celebrate and highlight Black History Month in his trio of stellar restaurants, it means something both flavorful and educational.

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On Being Trans: J Mase III Creates a Space to Feel Welcome

Trans-identifying, Seattle-based artist J Mase III has held many jobs in his life: in the nonprofit sector, in university settings, and as a boots-on-the-ground human-rights activist. But it wasn’t until Mase was fired from his most “cushy” position in higher education six years ago that he finally chose to hang up the nine-to-five lifestyle and become a full-time working artist. Ever since, Mase has been creating opportunities for himself and others while also making a living. In fact, his next artistic endeavor is centered on that delicate balance.

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Travis Thompson’s Ride From Burien to the “Corner Store” and Beyond

After performing on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon in support of Macklemore (aka Ben Haggerty) alongside fellow Emerald City rapper Dave B. (aka Dave Bowman) and world-famous DJ Premiere last year, Travis Thompson got stoned with two of his best friends atop his Times Square hotel. The moment, both in metaphor and in real life, was a high point for the Seattle-born lyricist. But, Thompson hopes, it won’t be the last view from atop a peak on the landscape.

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Who Serves Seattle’s Best Tacos?

No one knows when the first taco was created. But the tradition of putting meat and veggies into a corn or flour tortilla has lived for thousands of years. The beautiful thing about a taco is that anyone can make one. But the precarious thing about a taco is that not everyone can make them well. I grew up in Princeton, N.J., eating tacos with hard yellow shells. My mother, bless her heart, would cut up lettuce and tomatoes and add them to a four-quadrant plastic platter with shredded cheddar and grocery-store-packet-seasoned beef she made on the stovetop. I loved them. But I also realized there was another world out there with perfectly blended sauces and meat that echoed with flavor.

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FoodJake UittiSeattle Weekly
Blues Traveler Still Giving the Run-Around

John Popper can sing the complicated jazz tune “Whiplash” practically in his sleep. The song, featured prominently in the Oscar-winning movie of the same name, is burned into Popper’s brain because of the same man who inspired the devilish bandleader in the film: Anthony Biancosino. “Dr. B,” as he was affectionately known, was an award-winning high school band teacher at Princeton High School in Princeton, N.J. (where Popper and Whiplash director Damien Chazelle both attended, decades apart). And while he wasn’t nearly the authoritarian as he’s exaggerated to be in the 2014 movie, Dr. B did help Popper — the frontman and harmonica player for the Grammy-winning band Blues Traveler — flourish as a musician.

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Poutine Rules at Seattle’s Best Hockey Bar

After the explosion, Tim Pipes nearly threw in the towel. Then, a month later, he was robbed. Pipes has also undergone spinal fusion surgery and back surgery to remove a herniated disk. He’s been through a difficult divorce. But despite all these, the place he loves most, The Angry Beaver, a small, 80-person hockey bar he owns in the heart of Greenwood — that serves countless batches of poutine — has subsisted. And he has subsisted right along with it.

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Valtesse’s Art of the Tease

A year ago, Fiona Pepe was in search of inspiration. The Seattle dancer and photographer had left a 10-year career as one of the head performers at the sultry and beloved Can Can cabaret theater. On an excursion to France, she found herself strolling through the Parisian streets one morning. Looking for any decent book, Pepe picked up a tome titled The Mistress of Paris, which would quickly change her creative aspirations.

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Path of the Storm

It’s late in practice Thursday afternoon, and the Seattle Storm has just finished scrimmaging. Team members, legs tired, sweat dripping, line up around the basket to take free throws. It’s in these worn-out moments when mental and physical precision are key, after all. After a round of shots, Storm coach Dan Hughes brings his squad in for one more talk before dismissing them for the day. Practice is over.

But not for Breanna Stewart.

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Forging the Cultural Future of Northwest Folklife Festival

Seattle’s Northwest Folklife Festival is all about discovery. The Memorial Day weekend celebration at Seattle Center focuses on diversity of programming and letting attendees enjoy things they’ve never seen, heard, or even thought about before. This year’s 47th edition of Folklife (May 25–28) features local music standouts like Whitney Monge and Tres Leches, dance classes, introductions to art from all around the world, and amazing cuisine options.

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Roof-to-Table: Seattle restaurants spice up their menus by adding fresh ingredients grown in their own gardens

These days, more and more people care about what goes into their bodies—and not just caloric counts or gluten content. Diners want to know exactly where the bite of food on their fork staring them in face came from. What’s its origin story? Who grew corn that fed the chicken for this sandwich? With the arrival of the Information Age, people can now easily research ingredients, follow the careers of chefs whose dishes they adore, and repeat mantras like “organic” and “farm-to-table.” They can visit farms, pick their own berries, and dream about their own edible flower gardens. In other words, eating is no longer a mindless exercise.

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Pike Brewing Company Gets Refined With Tankard & Tun

Born in 1996 during the waning days of the grunge movement, Pike Brewing Company’s historic subterranean pub, just a few blocks from the center of Pike Place Market, The Pike Pub, is adorned with random stickers, exposed grating, and pipes painted black. The pub, which brews and serves some of the city’s most recognizable beer, feels comfortable and familiar, like your favorite ripped jeans/flannel shirt combo. But the famous locale has recently changed significantly.

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Why Does Craft Brewing Keep Growing?

In 2011, there were some 2,016 craft breweries in the United States, according to the Brewers Association. Just five years later, there were 5,234—and many believe this number will continue to grow. But why, exactly? What is it about craft breweries that the country adores? I asked some of Seattle’s most renowned brewers for their insights.

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Pickwick on the Edge

Galen Disston, lead singer for the soulful Seattle rock band Pickwick, trades in two creative escapes: his music, a lifelong ambition and an art form with infinite possibilities; and the intricate craft of watch building, an endeavor Disston–whose band’s new record, LoveJoys, is out June 10—began only recently.

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